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Posts Tagged ‘Community Support’

Developing Social Capital – An Approach

March 15, 2011 1 comment

Its all about building a soul into the spirit of the community, Social networks have been in existence for centuries; yes… its certainly true. Human communities settled and formed communities on river banks for thousands of years and were united as a social group with goals structured around food & hunting, shelter, security, mutual support, farming, etc., these communities grew big and formed distinct civilizations. In today’s world we try doing the same over a virtual platform, things can be so basic and simple provided right insight and approach is formulated.

The key in building social communities lies in the understanding the basic constituents. Every community and social grouping has fundamental units of functions [SFU] – Social fundamental unit,  addressing and enabling these units to function is key to the success of building community and social groups. Like in the real time communities there are some fundamentals that needs to be imbibed while forming communities.

1. Community Bonds among Individual elements.
Bonding within a community is very important, to create the bonding there needs to be goals defined and all in the community inadvertently pursue these set of goals. Its like floating a forum for users of one product series who want to achieve better product adoption and usage across as a group commune together. Some publish articles, some post questions, some answer, some pool in external references, etc., This is the key , build tools and work-flows around these goals to ensure that there is always an opportunity to debate, share, compliment, report, reference, etc., These help building relationships and bonding within a group. There is always Cohesion and Inclusion and no Confrontation or retributions.

2. Community Bonds between Groups of Elements.
Having these all out functional groups there is the next level of collaboration in the form of inter group bonding; in a community business support environment users will need each other strengths to collaborate for a solution. An example is a product buyer comes with an issue on the product compatibility with another brand over certain feature sets; he posts a question over the forum, over FB wall and possibly tweet too. Here there is an opportunity for this reported cause to get viral and many to see it for the good and for bad. There needs to be a response and this can be addressed by the Individual elements or Other Groups of Elements. There can be a technical support team that can respond; if an user reports an issue with much complexity like an interoperability then is not in the control of the support team, they can very well invoke the design & engineering team to advice and action. This is community supporting community, build bonds between groups of elements; this is also called as community support.

3. Platform as a Component.
With the complexities of real life engagements moving into a social application based interaction and responses, there needs to be a strong platform and governance model that helps in bridging the gaps between monitoring, responding, evaluating, enabling, analyzing etc., from a product manufacturer perspective. It also needs to take care of applying work-flows that will support knowledge sharing, collaboration, ideation and support, best practice mapping, etc., There are many a systems at play in the market there are a few that have listed below. These platforms offer the facility and functionalities to support most if not all of the above.

Social capital means the intensity, virality, capability of a Social community. The more the cohesive strength and collaborative spirit the higher the capital. Better Social capital translates to the following benefits for a Product & Technology Manufacturer.

1. Reduces transaction costs
2. Provides vivid and direct avenues for revenues
3. Provides a competitive edge
4. Social Capital with the best practices provides market differentiation
5. Social Capital with the right systems enable conducive collaboration environment
6. Helps build openness and transparency
7. Community Involvement Builds Social Capital
8. Promotes Accountability
9. Product and Logo Loyalty
10. Community Satisfaction & Delight
11. Direct channel with customers

Jesu Valiant – 2011

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